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Terrific Toys

Leah Reisman

There are so many toys, and so many favorites, that there is a museum dedicated solely to kids’ favorite toys and games

Wednesday, December 05, 2018

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he National Toy Hall of Fame, which is situated in the Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York, features the world’s most popular toys and games from classic oldies to the latest fads. Every year since 1998, the public is welcome to nominate their favorite toys. A group of educators and historians are then tasked with choosing the winners for the year. Over the years, a wide range of toys and games have been featured, from board games to jump rope to dolls. This year there were 12 nominees, including some familiar choices, such as the American Girl doll, chalk, Chutes & Ladders, a sled, Uno, and Tic-Tac-Toe. The winners were recently announced on Thursday, November 8 and...they...are... Uno, Pinball, and the Magic Eight Ball. Do youthink those toys are winners?

 

The Toy Champions

Let’s take a closer look at some winning toys from the past few years:

 

Chess (Inducted 2013)

One of the world’s oldest and most popular games, the origins of chess can be traced to India. Our modern chess game is based off an ancient Indian war game called Chaturanga. Today’s version of chess is most similar to the game played in England during the Renaissance. Playing chess like a pro involves two skills. “Tactics” refer to short-term moves, while “strategy” refers to advance planning. Playing chess can improve your planning and thinking skills.

Today, chess players of all ages compete in competitions, from small, local chess clubs to international competitions. The World Chess Federation (FIDE) was founded in Paris in 1924, and presides over world championships.

 

Candyland (Inducted 2005)

In the early 1940s, a polio epidemic struck the United States. A woman named Eleanor Abbot felt bad for the thousands of children stuck at home recuperating from the disease. She decided to invent games to help relieve their boredom. Her most popular game was Candyland, a game that many people recall as being the first board game they have ever played. (Excerpted from Mishpacha Jr., Issue 738)

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