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New Column: The Courage to Stand Apart

Aliza Goldin

Many girls spend much of their elementary years learning and being tested on the subject of tzniyus. Aside from the fact that I intuitively feel tzniyus is not something girls should be “tested on” — it doesn’t matter what the number on top of your paper says if you can’t figure out what to do in real time — a large percentage of girls enter high school with the misconception that tzniyus is only about inches and elbows.

Wednesday, April 04, 2012

floral designAfter my book, 6 diaries, came out, I received correspondence from girls all over the world telling me what a major thing it was for them to hear other girls’ perspectives on this all-important topic. What I had to say about tzniyus wasn’t half as exciting to them as it was to hear about other teens’ real struggles to make tzniyus a part of their lives in a real way. The book is compiled of journal entries by girls just like you, who agreed to take part in a yearlong project (CSA) to work on various areas of tzniyus. The entries are written exclusively by teens for teens.

I have great hopes for this column. One is to share some really incredible thoughts about tzniyus that I’ve picked up over the years. This stuff is empowering, inspiring, and truly life changing —not exactly words you would associate with tzniyus until now. Tzniyus, at its core, is about finding out who you truly are — underneath your clothing, your talents, and even your group of friends — and learning how to project that without letting other things take center stage. That, by the way, is exactly why everyone tends to feel their blood pressure rise when the topic of tzniyus comes up. Instinctively, we know the importance of what we’re dealing with — our very identities are at stake.

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