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Minding your E-mail Manners

Sara Glaz

Remember when Bubby hit “Reply All” to those pictures you sent of the kids, sending her comments about Shaina’s baby fat to all your relatives and friends… in all caps? Everyone’s got at least one e-mail horror story. Here’s how to keep those cyberspace etiquette bloopers to a minimum.

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Gone are the days of simply remembering to dot the I’s, cross the T’s, and attach a stamp to a letter. Since technology has taken over and e-mail forms the majority of our written communication, we now have to master a different set of letter-writing rules. E-mail etiquette, also called “netiquette,” tells us what is and isn’t appropriate when it comes to our online communication, both inside the office and out. Find out what netiquette experts and some professional women have to say about the topic.   Be Wary of Broadcasting Aside from typing addresses into the “Recipients” box, there are several ways to address an e-mail: “Reply,” “Reply All,” “Cc,” and “Bcc.” When is it appropriate to “Reply All” (as opposed to simply “Reply”)? And when should you “Cc” someone and “Bcc” another? Say a few of your friends want to get together for a night out. Suri sends an e-mail to everyone asking for dining suggestions: “Ladies, sushi or Italian tonight?” Ooohh, a Dragon Roll sounds great but do I really need to flood everyone else’s inbox with my palate preferences? The ground rule for personal e-mails, as offered byRamonaEmerson of the Huffington Post (1/30/12), is to hit “Reply All” only if it’s a group invite to ten or fewer people, or a discussion thread where most of the recipients are participating in the conversation.

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