Join The Conversation With Mishpacha's Weekly Newsletter



Claim to Fame: Rebound Power

C.B. Lieber

Looking for a fun new way to jump and dance? Tired of the standard aerobics routine? Mrs. Faigy Wasserman has the solution for you.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

fame

Photo: Shutterstock

Have you ever heard the expression, “It’s all in your mind”? Well, with Faigy Wasserman, it’s all in your shoes! Don’t try to take her classes in your regular running shoes — you can’t. Instead, you’ll get an awesome pair of rebound shoes to bounce in as you work out to the newest Jewish music hits. 

Faigy cheerfully shares the story of how she encountered Kangoo Jumps, as the shoes are called. “I wanted to lose weight after my baby was born, and I discovered Kangoo classes,” she says. “I tried it and I was hooked. The classes are so different from the typical aerobics class I was used to. The shoes are very easy to move in, and the classes put me in a great mood. I remember literally bouncing home.” 

Rebound shoes were originally designed for joggers and other athletes, to lessen impact on their joints. They were redesigned in the 1990s and soon became very popular, so they’re a relatively new addition to the exercise scene. Faigy started taking classes four years ago, when she lived in Brooklyn. Then she moved to Monsey with her family, and couldn’t find any Kangoo classes in the area. 

“I missed the classes tremendously, so I created my own,” she says matter-of-factly. Well, maybe it wasn’t that easy! “I had to get trained,” she relates. “I became a certified group fitness trainer and I got a license to become a Kangoo instructor. At first I thought I’d just have a good time with my friends, but then word spread, and soon I created my own business called Fun ‘n’ Fit.”

 

The rebound shoes are very low impact, which makes it easier to jump around and work out. “You feel like you’re working out for free, since you’re not working that hard,” Faigy explains. “It’s great for weight loss, since it burns 25 to 50 percent more calories than a regular aerobics class, and it works for any age and any fitness level. It improves posture, balance, and coordination. But what keeps people coming back is that it’s so much fun.” 

Faigy generally gives between 8 and 12 classes a week, for both girls and women. There are 15 to 20 girls in each class, and smaller groups for women. Her students range in age from fifth graders to bubbies. The classes are divided by age, with special groups for beginners. 

“The feedback has been phenomenal, baruch Hashem,” she says enthusiastically. “I love the variety, the different ages, the different personalities I get to work with. I love watching a new group of women or girls getting into it. It’s addictive, it’s therapeutic, and it’s great kosher entertainment.” 

To keep the classes fresh and exciting, Faigy keeps up with the latest Jewish hits. “Each song takes me approximately two hours to prepare,” she says. “The moves have to be aligned, and they have to be on the girls’ level. I also modify my classes according to age and fitness level.”

Related Stories

Jr. Tales: Getting the Picture

Rachel Stein

Pumped up with excitement, Chava bounced across her room to investigate the brightly colored package...

Which Voice is Really You?

Leora Cohen

Two inner voices give us constant advice on time management. Which one has our best interests at hea...

Claim to Fame: Gadi Pollack

C.B. Lieber

The incredible Rebbe Lev Tov and his ragtag group of shipwrecked passengers… A green-faced Esther Ha...

Share this page with a friend. Fill in the information below, and we'll email your friend a link to this page on your behalf.

Your name
Your email address
You friend's name
Your friend's email address
Please type the characters you see in the image into the box provided.
CAPTCHA
Message


MM217
 
At Our Doorstep
Rabbi Moshe Grylak In Israel, intermarriage still has some shock value
The Wrong Conversation
Yonoson Rosenblum How can we reattach Jews to the Jewish story?
Heart on Your Sleeve
Eytan Kobre Being pro-phylactery can be downright prophylactic
The Silver Lining
Alexandra Fleksher Who is brave enough to buck the dangerous trends?
Top 5 Uniquely Jewish Words
Rabbi Dovid Bashevkin For some concepts, Yidden have the best words
10 Questions for Avi Kehat
Rachel Bachrach The Chesed Fund, for desperate people who need a fortune
On Speaking Terms
Rabbi Ron Yitzchok Eisenman He learned firsthand, “What goes around comes around”
Stressed Out
Jacob L. Freedman “We’re going to aggressively help you take care of you”
Mona Knew to Pick a Winner
Riki Goldstein “Shloime, let’s sing this on Motzaei Shabbos”
Four Stanzas You Don’t Just Sing
Riki Goldstein “This is not a niggun that you just sing!” he exclaimed
A Part of Me
Riki Goldstein The fruit of two years’ preparation and collaboration
Worth the Hassle?
Riki Goldstein Travel can be challenging for musicians and bands
Know It All
Faigy Peritzman The wiser I get, the more I realize how little I know
No Time to Breathe
Sarah Chana Radcliffe When we don’t have a minute to spare is when we pause
On Dry Ground
Rebbetzin Shira Smiles Every day we thank Hashem for the miracle of dry land