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Amazing You: Take a Walk

Tzivia E. Adler

Did you ever see a puppet attached to strings? You pull on the strings, and an arm or a leg moves. It takes a lot of practice to pull the string so the puppet moves properly. Moving properly is hard work. Somehow, you figured it out before you were two years old! How does your amazing body take step after step without tipping over or bumping into a wall?

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Moving Parts

When you walk, your entire body moves with every step. Muscles pull bones, and joints bend. Your legs swing forward, your toes bend and straighten, your arms swing, and your spine flexes, your eyes move to check the ground under your feet, the ground a few steps ahead, and the scenery around you. If you see something interesting, your head will turn to check it out. Your eyes quickly face front again, so you don't trip over something.

Best Food Forward

What happens when you want to walk? First, the calf muscle, below and behind your knee, contracts and lifts your heel. This makes the knee of that leg bend. This in turn activates muscles in your foot, so the toes can bend, too. Standing on the toes of one foot, with the knee bent, is very wobbly! Your brain wants to fix that. Your weight automatically shifts to the second foot.

 

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