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Jolly Solly: Troubled Waters

R. Atkins

“Why don’t we build huts on our rafts? Then we could sail far away from civilization, and stay there as long as we liked”

Wednesday, January 03, 2018

 Mishpacha image

 

F ishel and Faivish were trudging home from school, looking extremely gloomy and dispirited.

“Do you know how much math homework I’ve got?” demanded Fishel, neglecting to mention that Mr. Hardcastle had given him double the usual amount because he’d fooled around in class instead of doing his work.

“Well, whatever you’ve got, I bet I’ve got more!” retorted Faivish, who’d spent his math class doing sudokus, claiming that they were a lot more mathematical than algebra — but he hadn’t been able to persuade his teacher.

“I’ve got enough homework to keep me up all night!”

“I’ve got enough homework to keep me up all week!”

The troublesome two stopped and glared at each other, only to find they couldn’t even muster the energy for a fight.

“What I need is a holiday,” declared Fishel.

“Yeah, me too. At a beach, without a stitch of work to do,” echoed Faivish, agreeing with his brother for a change.

“I’d sail out to sea on a raft, and no one would be able to catch me,” sighed Fishel dreamily.

“Me too. No math homework. No spelling homework. No any homework,” murmured Faivish yearningly.

Fishel suddenly stopped in his tracks.

“I’ve got an idea!” he exclaimed.

 

“What is it?” asked Faivish curiously.

“Why don’t we build some kind of huts on our rafts? Then we could sail far away from civilization, and stay there as long as we liked.”

“Not bad,” Faivish conceded. “Away from school, and grownups, and people telling us what to do.”

“We could lie in bed in our huts all day long.”

“And when we’re tired of resting, we could dive into the water and have a swim.”

“And then catch a fish for supper.”

“Two fish.”

“Ten fish.”

“A hundred fish.”

Fishel diplomatically changed the subject.

“Let’s get started on our huts as soon as we get home.”

“Yeah. Hey, we won’t need our math books any more. Not much point in lugging them home in that case. Why don’t we dump them somewhere?”

Fishel and Faivish deposited their books gleefully onto a nearby bench. (Excerpted from Mishpacha Jr., Issue 692)

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MM217
 
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