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License Plates

Rochel Burstyn

You surely know what license plates are, although depending where you live, you might call them number plates, registration plates, or tags. They’re those little doohickeys with numbers and/or letters attached to the back (and in some areas, the front as well) of vehicles. So what are they used for, who makes them, and what do they look like around the world? Wash your windshields, adjust your mirror, let’s zoom off and find out!

 

Streets, Roads, and Paths

Rochel Burstyn

If you’re like me, as you walk along the street, you don’t give much thought to the actual ... street. So today we’re going to meet someone who makes our roads a pleasure to walk, ride, and drive on. Meet Mr. Shlomo Hirsch from the New York City Department of Transportation.

 

Along for the Ride

Chany Rosengarten

Some people think we have our white van because we travel a lot. That’s their mistake, because aside from carpool, my mother avoids driving us like she avoids cottage cheese. She usually leaves us home and calls Nina. Nina is the babysitter worth staying awake for.

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