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The Uniform Look

Malkie Lowinger

For the Zelcer family, business revolves around school rules: specifically, the rules dictating that uniform dress code in our girls’ schools. In their flagship Brooklyn store, they speak about plaids and pleats, sweaters and stripes, with a passion that comes from years of dedication to their craft. For this family, uniforms are the furthest thing from boring

 

Shabbos Crown

C. Rosenberg

For chassidim around the world, it’s a non-negotiable part of their Shabbos wardrobe. But ask any experienced shtreimel maker, and you’ll learn that the handcrafted hat with a historic tradition demands an art and craft all its own

 

Long Distance Lessons

Faigy Schonfeld

With virtual classrooms, multiple time zones, and classes of students who only meet in person once a year, it’s a school like no other. The Shluchim Online School harnesses technology so that children of Chabad shluchim can stay home — even if home is a remote backwater lacking basic Jewish infrastructure — and still obtain a rich Torah education

 

Making the Grade

Dovid Sussman

With a computerized phone system, automatic bank transfers, and a team of administrators, you’d think you’d stumbled on a successful business. But this enterprise distributes money instead of collecting it

 

Twenty Seconds of Gratitude

The medium seems modest: a cheerful poster with whimsical illustrations and the text of a brachah most know by heart. But its reach — outside millions of restrooms in households, institutions, and buildings worldwide — has revolutionized our attitude toward a daily activity that might be considered mundane. Who’s behind those ubiquitous “asher yatzar” signs around the globe?

 

Everybody’s Wall

Esther Teichtal

For the multitudes who approach the Kosel each year, the experience is all about connection. People come. Pray. Leave. Perhaps they drop a coin into a beggar’s hand in passing. Most leave feeling uplifted, but not many realize that a vast cadre of people work, quite literally, around the clock to make the holiest site in the world accessible and inspiring to all

 

Master of Ceremonies

Rifka Junger

For the new couple about to embark on the construction of a faithful Jewish home, this night is once in a lifetime. For the staff at the wedding hall, it’s a logistical and diplomatic feat that gets repeated — with the same devotion to details — for every chassan and kallah

 

Born in the Mixer Bowl

Malky Lowinger

For fresh and fragrant challah or heavenly cinnamon babka, generations of Monsey residents knew they could always find a slice of Gan Eden in the Frank family’s bakery. What they may not have realized is that when the streets grew dark and the storefront closed, family members ranging from grandparents to newborns would spend hours preparing the confections that so delighted their customers — and kept them coming back for more

 

Men of Many Hats

Yisroel Besser

His relatives in Germany were sure he’d ruin his family by moving to the Holy Land, but Avraham Yosef Ferster’s little hat shop in Jerusalem proved them wrong. Even as the new, casual breed of secular Israelis discarded their hats, the Ferster line blossomed along with the burgeoning yeshivah and chassidic world. Two generations later, the family business is still providing that crowning touch for Torah scholars and shy teenagers alike.

 

A Breed Apart

Margie Pensak

They spend the bulk of their waking hours on the family cattle farms in Pennsylvania, but the Gutmans would never consider living outside an established Torah hub — a lesson in priorities as deeply ingrained as the family's multi-generational affinity for cattle dealing. Four generations after Max Gutman first found a foothold in York County, his Jewish values and uncompromising convictions still drive the family business

 

The Customer Comes First

Yermi Marlow

With three branches, tens of thousands of products, and a robust clientele, who would believe that Kay’s Supermarket was once a small, struggling deli? Almost five decades after proprietor Avigdor Langberg took the helm, the iconic London establishment has morphed into a thriving modern supermarket. And yes, it still offers that old-time herring — along with a trademark personal touch

 

Meating Point

Riki Goldstein

They arrived in the Holy Land destitute but confident in their butchery skills, and swiftly gained the trust and loyalty of Jerusalem’s residents. Decades later, the Hackers have exchanged their iceboxes and bicycles for modern freezers and delivery trucks — but their butcher shop is still the city’s prime address for Shabbos and Yom Tov fare

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