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Free to Fly

Sarah Chana Radcliffe, M. Ed., C. Psych.

This time of year brings a chance to clean the slate, to start anew. We want to forgive and forget, and have our own wrongdoings forgiven and forgotten. We dream of starting fresh, stepping happily into a future that’s unencumbered by the baggage from the past. But how can we get rid of the ballast that’s weighing us down?

 

Forged by Their Faith

Mishpacha Contributors

Teshuvah: Hashem's ultimate act of chesed, the opportunity to lift oneself onto a plane of timelessness, so that one can turn back the clock and reshape reality. In the following pages we find three courageous women, women who listened to the whispered stirrings of their souls and discovered the emunah that lay deep inside.

 

Not Enough Time

C. B. Gavant

Shivah allows those who lost a loved one to focus exclusively on the person they lost, and to start processing the pain. But when a relative passes away close to Yom Tov, that process is aborted. Mourners share their experiences of the intermingling of personal sorrow and national joy.

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Winds of Fear
Rabbi Moshe Grylak The juxtaposition of Irma and Elul
Making Our Story His
Yonoson Rosenblum On Rosh Hashanah we do not hide
No Icing on the Cake
Eytan Kobre Society — and sanity — has lost
Soul Stirring
Rabbi Avrohom Neuberger Simply put, the Yamim Noraim work
Day in the Life of Aaron Ovadia
Rachel Bachrach Aaron Ovadia’s Drops of Light Project
Even Your In-Laws
Jacob L. Freedman No big reward if it’s not tough
Connecting the Dots
Rabbi Emanuel Feldman The evil, the eclipse, the destruction, the goodness
Above the Clouds
Faigy Peritzman Taking no step of my journey for granted
Moving Forward
Sarah Chana Radcliffe Rosh Hashanah invites us into our future
Kings and Queens
Rebbetzin Debbie Greenblatt Such is the power of kavod