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Free to Fly

Sarah Chana Radcliffe, M. Ed., C. Psych.

This time of year brings a chance to clean the slate, to start anew. We want to forgive and forget, and have our own wrongdoings forgiven and forgotten. We dream of starting fresh, stepping happily into a future that’s unencumbered by the baggage from the past. But how can we get rid of the ballast that’s weighing us down?

 

Forged by Their Faith

Mishpacha Contributors

Teshuvah: Hashem's ultimate act of chesed, the opportunity to lift oneself onto a plane of timelessness, so that one can turn back the clock and reshape reality. In the following pages we find three courageous women, women who listened to the whispered stirrings of their souls and discovered the emunah that lay deep inside.

 

Not Enough Time

C. B. Gavant

Shivah allows those who lost a loved one to focus exclusively on the person they lost, and to start processing the pain. But when a relative passes away close to Yom Tov, that process is aborted. Mourners share their experiences of the intermingling of personal sorrow and national joy.



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With All Due Respect
Rabbi Moshe Grylak The honor of every human being
What We Lost
Yonoson Rosenblum A long view, a larger perspective
Reprobate Return
Eytan Kobre Loyalty to the true and the morally upright
My Own Gentle Giant
Jacob L. Freedman Finn smirked. “Do whatever you want, Dr. Israel”
Individually United
Faigy Peritzman Two contradictions classify the Korban Pesach as a chok
Hearing Problems
Sarah Chana Radcliffe In fight mode, you may hear attacks never said
An Equal Focus
Rebbetzin Shira Smiles Remaining true to our most authentic feminine selves
The Marketer, Part I
D. Himy, M.S. CCC-SLP and Zivia Reischer “I’m late, my work is late, I come to meetings late”
Dear Neighbor and Friend
Words Unspoken I know you’ve been given challenging kids