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Free to Fly

Sarah Chana Radcliffe, M. Ed., C. Psych.

This time of year brings a chance to clean the slate, to start anew. We want to forgive and forget, and have our own wrongdoings forgiven and forgotten. We dream of starting fresh, stepping happily into a future that’s unencumbered by the baggage from the past. But how can we get rid of the ballast that’s weighing us down?

 

Forged by Their Faith

Mishpacha Contributors

Teshuvah: Hashem's ultimate act of chesed, the opportunity to lift oneself onto a plane of timelessness, so that one can turn back the clock and reshape reality. In the following pages we find three courageous women, women who listened to the whispered stirrings of their souls and discovered the emunah that lay deep inside.

 

Not Enough Time

C. B. Gavant

Shivah allows those who lost a loved one to focus exclusively on the person they lost, and to start processing the pain. But when a relative passes away close to Yom Tov, that process is aborted. Mourners share their experiences of the intermingling of personal sorrow and national joy.



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A Century of Horror — and Hope
Rabbi Moshe Grylak More connected than at first glance
Sundown
Eytan Kobre When Chazal say so, that eclipses all else
Great Expectations
Jacob L. Freedman Not just his personal nachas machine
Vote of Thanks
Rabbi Ron Yitzchok Eisenman Dov Ber was using Hashem as an excuse
Today’s Trash
Faigy Peritzman “Guess what I did today!”
Navigating In-Lawing
Sarah Chana Radcliffe Nurturing this relationship with kindness, consideration...
From Humdrum to Happy
Rebbetzin Aviva Feiner The challenge: infusing these days with joy!