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Disorder in The Court

Shimmy Blum

It is a very rare occurrence in America — where the separation of church and state is enshrined in the Constitution — that religious theology should become a hotly debated political issue. However, many tenets of Islam’s sharia law system clash with US and Western law, and the intent of some Islamists to insinuate sharia into the American justice system has set off amber warning lights among intelligence and legal experts, who sense a new, insidious threat to the American way.

 

Abandoned to Nasrallah’s Mercy

Aharon Granevich-Granot

Ghajar, a sleepy village along Israel’s pastoral northern border with Lebanon, is one of many towns in today’s Eretz Yisrael whose land is claimed by both Israelis and Arabs. This town is populated exclusively by Arabs who would prefer to retain their Israeli citizenship. Prime Minister Netanyahu submitted a plan to the U.N. to hand Ghajar over to Lebanese rule as a gesture to President Obama, Mishpacha visited the village whose residents fear being handed over on the altar of the peace process.

 

Shooting Under Par

Rachel Ginsberg

Thirty years ago, Zohar Sharon was a top Mossad operative who lost his sight on a secret mission. Today, he’s the world’s best blind golfer, defending a string of world championships, even though he’d never even been on a golf course before. Yet, his trophy-lined living room is more than just a showcase for the number-one man on the green. It’s become a place for nurturing the growth of Torah in an apathetic, secular community.

 

Beds, Toothbrushes, and Canoes: How to Count 1.3 Billion (Wary) People

Michal Ish Shalom

American citizens may have been wary of the recent census, but not nearly as wary as their Chinese counterparts. With many worried about penalties they will have to pay for violating laws, census workers in China face a difficult challenge, and often resort to unconventional methods of counting the countries estimated 1.3 billion people.

 

In Proximity to the Patriarchs

Aharon Granevich-Granot

Over three decades ago, a group of men descended into the underground caverns of Mearas HaMachpeilah, approaching what they assumed to be the actual burial plots of the patriarchs. They discovered the opening to the original caves in the Yitzchak Hall, built around the markers for the graves of Yitzchak and Rivka, whose burials we read about this week. The underground entryway has since been cemented shut by the Arabs, but that didn’t stop six of the original team from coming to reenact their adventure.



 
What Are We Supposed to Do?
Rabbi Moshe Grylak A tried-and-true remedy — and it shook the heavens
Badgered into Submission
Yonoson Rosenblum Avatars of political correctness in search of dissenters
Drinking Doubt Away
Eytan Kobre Meaning is indispensable for generating happiness
Checks and Balances III
Mishpacha Readers The conversation continues...
Memorable Melodies of Modzhitz
Rabbi Mordechai Besser The struggling survivors became kings in shul on Shabbos
A Whole Song and Dance
Rabbi Ron Yitzchak Eisenman One of those small acts that are giant leaps of chesed
Diamonds
Jacob L. Freedman MD "Each Jewish woman is a bas Melech, Dr. Freedman!"
Streamlined Service
Riki Goldstein "JewishMusic Stream is still about classic kosher music”
Perfect Harmony
Riki Goldstein "The arrangements literally changed the entire song"
Hang On to the Glow
Riki Goldstein Back to the warm camp Shabbos memories
Marking Miracles
Faigy Peritzman The miracles are there, but our eyes are blind to them
Going Against the Current
Sarah Chana Radcliffe Wise to deny our kids something all their friends have?
Clothed in Splendor
Mrs. Elana Moskowitz When dressing up is spiritual, not superficial
The Spokesman: Part IV
D. Himy, M.S. CCC-SLP and Zivia Reischer Every sentence tells a story; make yours well told